Intel Compute Stick BOXSTK2M3W64CC

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  • Updated 2 years ago
So far this version of the Intel Compute Stick is much nicer. It's more powerful, has more space and memory, and the Wireless works very well. There's 1 USB 3.0 port in the stick, adn 2 USB 3.0 ports in the power adapter.
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Eric Ochoa

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Posted 2 years ago

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Robb, Official Rep

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Eric,

What CPU is in it?
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Eric Ochoa

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It's a Core m3 CPU clocked at 900MHz
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Darius - PRODO.us, Champion

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I think It is too expensive for what is and what it is used for (digital signage). But I believe it would be great traveling mate or even home media player for your living room.
(Edited)
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Eric Ochoa

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Well, from a usability standpoint I think it is more expensive to constantly troubleshoot an underpowered device. If people are willing to spend $400+ for a NUC to drive a signage display, they should be willing to spend ~$280 for something that will be equally sufficient for less money and less hassle. Don't you think? I don't demand very much from my less powered compute sticks, but I am reading a lot of complaints about their performance.
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Darius - PRODO.us, Champion

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Because people are expecting too much from the little guy or not have them set properly. These are great for static content or I have no problem what so ever streaming videos every day alongside other content. It handles it like a boss. Anyways, as I said before, I would not use sticks for anything, but static content such as directories. Now you can buy this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA24G43J6519&cm_re=intel_stick-_-83-800-010-_-... or you can buy this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856102141&cm_re=nuc-_-56-102-141-_-Product The second one will need extra, up to $100 for HDD/SSD + 4GB RAM + OS and still it is gonna beat the stick in price and provide more than enough performance. Also keep in mind the temperatures. You would be really stretching the envelope with powerful processors in a stick form.
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Darius - PRODO.us, Champion

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One more thing. I just now was looking at all three different new Intel Compute Stick models and noticed that the most expensive m3 and m5 each have 3XUSB 3.0 ports. The Atom model have 1XUSB 2.0 and 1XUSB 3.0 ports. You may get Internet problems if you were to use USB/Ethernet hub for wired connection thru USB 3.0 port. I had issues with that until switched to USB 2.0.
(Edited)
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RPTDigital Signage

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NUC and Sticks aren't in the same league of capabilities or pricing. It's all based on expectations and budgets. I worry that too many signs will become negative experiences quickly if we under power them on the player side. As users find more engagement opportunities the content always becomes more demanding. A solid powerful reliable player is really a small part of TOC, but its the area everyone seems to try to beat dollars out of the project.

Unless you buy an already packaged and configured NUC, installing Memory, an SSD Drive and usually a WiFi card (those tiny antenna connectors are a real risk for many assemblers), then you can start installing an OEM version of Windows or Linux. If your time is worth anything you're already at least 3 times the cost of a Stick that ships with Windows pre-installed.

Don't expect too much from tiny and inexpensive and you won't be disappointed. Push them too hard and they slow down with heat and CPU throttling, where the NUC keeps running at full speed.

Darius is correct that Sticks are great for static content on a budget. When choosing a player remember that the future may (almost certainly) hold much more demanding content and your Stick may become a throw away as you start over for more CPU power.

The Atom processors, in my experience, run really well but hot under demand and throttle to very low effective speeds. Properly cooled they'll run easily with an i3 NUC, when they get hot they crawl.
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Darius - PRODO.us, Champion

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Unless you buy an already packaged and configured NUC, installing Memory, an SSD Drive and usually a WiFi card (those tiny antenna connectors are a real risk for many assemblers), then you can start installing an OEM version of Windows or Linux. If your time is worth anything you're already at least 3 times the cost of a Stick that ships with Windows pre-installed.
This is an awesome post RPTDigital, but on this I got to somewhat disagree with you. Installing WiFi is not usual on NUCs. Most of them come with WiFi cards already... and Ethernet ports... and more USB ports. If by any chance you got yourself a NUC without one, then installing $20 USB WiFi adapter + antenna is a piece of cake. Popping in SSD and Memory takes no longer then 5 minutes even the first time. Installing Windows + configuring takes the most of your time, unambiguously. I made a Windows 10 installation USB key that I simply plug in, start installation process, and go do something else while it is at it. So, time value vise... it is not all that straight forward and simple. Of course, you cannot beat the price of stick if you have to do many things yourself, but curb your expectations for what you can get out of them, too.
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Eric Ochoa

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Unless you are buying outdated hardware, it's impossible to get a NUC now without wireless. It's best to avoid assembling and loading the OS yourself if you are not adept at doing it. I'm a system builder so this is easy to me, and I keep images on external storage so buying a brand new NUC and going from scratch to booting OS takes about 5 minutes, all drivers installed.
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Darius - PRODO.us, Champion

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Lets do not keep people discourage from adventurism and learning stuff from mistakes... building PC and especially NUCs is not all that complicated at all, and I say this as no technician. Assembling hardware is pretty straight forward in these days... pretty much like Lego bricks I must say. Do the research first and buy the right parts! Installing Windows can be fiddly and you need to know your way around the BIOS or at least know what BIOS is )))
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Eric Ochoa

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I did try to disclose the caveat of "if you're not adept". Some people really don't want to fool with the assembly of a machine, even if it's just 2 sticks of ram and a SSD the size of a stick of gum :)
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RPTDigital Signage

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Thanks for the comments. I haven't kept that NUC current since we built a number of 3rd generation i3 NUC players. Over 30 years of Industrial automation I've assembled literally hundreds of PCs, and the NUC and modern WIndows install is really simple and almost idiot proof. 

Intel's latest offerings (Generations change quickly)  seems to have a mixed bag of NUCs ie: some 5th generation i3 don't have soldered down WiFi but do have 4K video and and DisplayPort Intel HD 5500 Graphics (good tor 3 monitors) . All have wired Ethernet which is the missing link on almost all Sticks (if you value a single box approach).

In our demo shop, for personal interest,  I've been running a Kangaroo PC (best deal around see my posts by searching Kangaroo PC) Atom X8500 against a 3rd Generation i3 NUC with my own simple RiseVision Video Torture test. There are 3 1080P Placeholder on top of each other and scaled.

The i3 NUC chugs through everything and never loses a video, but as the day progresses one by one the video frames on the Atom based Kangaroo drop off and go solid black and never come back until I restart the player. They share the same WiFi with only one other lightly used computer and are in the same environment. It seems that something is Rise doesn't retry or time out to retry, the dead frame just goes dead and seems to be waiting forever and not getting anything. 

SO, I'm a very big fan of buying too much CPU and Graphics horsepower at reasonable prices and like Darius says I'll only apply a Stick (or Kangaroo) to a known light duty display in a good environment.
(Edited)